Posts Tagged ‘The Safety Doc’

SAFETY DOC PODCAST 60: The 4 Self Awareness Archetypes – Introspection’s Fatal Flaw

PODCAST-To better understand the primary quadrants of self-awareness, Dr. Perrodin examines an exemplary article written by Tasha Eurich, PhD, of Harvard Business Review.  She wrote “Self-awareness seems to have become the latest management buzzword — and for good reason. Research suggests that when we see ourselves clearly, we are more confident and more creative. We make…

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SAFETY DOC PODCAST 59: Hawaii Missile Alert: The STRANGE Narrative – Interview with Jim Malliard

PODCAST-Paranormal investigator Jim Malliard and host David Perrodin discuss the puzzling inconsistencies of the January 13, 2018 notification that Hawaii was minutes from a ballistic missile impact.  Although the alert was an error, the circumstances of the event are convoluted and information released since the flub only adds to the confusion.  Jim and David smoke…

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SAFETY DOC PODCAST 58: Video Gaming the System – Are Video Games a Debilitating Addiction?

PODCAST-Dr. Perrodin, PhD, sifts and winnows a pair of articles pertaining to the controversial pathologizing of video games as addictive behaviors warranting recognition by the World Health Organization and American Psychiatric Association.   DIRECT LINK to MP3 of this Episode:  https://tinyurl.com/SDP58   HOW GAMING ADDICTION BECOMES A MEDICAL DIAGNOSIS Gaming addiction and social media addiction are…

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Safety Doc Podcast #57: Irrational Desire for Perfection or Dread of Social Failure – Why are Younger Adults are so Depressed?

PODCAST – The overwhelming pursuit of perfection is driving young people into increased levels of depression and anxiety per a Yahoo article that referenced a study of over 41,000 college students between 1989-2016 in America, Canada and Great Britain.  (Parker, 2018). In this episode of The Safety Doc Podcast, Dr. Perrodin centers his analysis and…

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Cajun Navy Insider – Katie Pechon Interview / TRUE UNTOLD STORIES – SDP#46

PODCAST-When we think of rescuers, our thoughts default to police, fire and EMS. However, another group, much less formal, has been significantly involved in natural disaster rescue efforts across the southern US, primarily Louisiana and Texas, for the past decade. That assembly is referred to as the “Cajun Navy” and identifies ad-hoc volunteer groups comprising…

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Back to School Safety Special – Time to be Terrified!! – SDP#39

High-drama multi-agency intruder response simulations transpire daily in schools across America. This hyper-realistic approach to school safety has produced a flurry of litigation centering psychological trauma for adults and children. Furthermore, theatrical drills are not supported by empirical research and differ greatly from other preparedness practices.

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Why We Can’t Compare Disasters: WTC, Murrah, Katrina & More – SDP#37

There are several reasons why each disaster should be studied as an individual unit. By isolating communications and geography specific to time, context and situation, Dr. Perrodin demonstrates the inherent problems with comparing disasters. He also notes the incredible impact of “lived experiences” and longitudinal demographic factors that contributed to the improbable rescue of 500,000 people in only 9 hours from Lower Manhattan on 9/11/01.

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Sophie’s Choice, Moral Dilemmas & 9/11 Research Design Issues – SDP#36

Moral dilemmas center ethical choices in rescue operations in which the grueling decision is between, at times, equally-deserving alternatives. Dr. Perrodin also critiques a safety response article comparing the actions of rescuers present at the Murrah Building and rescuers present at the World Trade Center – noting such comparisons hold great challenges to distilling information that can be generalized to other settings.

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One Question Predicted Emotional Breakdown Better Than Any Other – SDP#34

A WWII field psychiatrist found that infantry soldiers in the 5th Army survived a maximum of 238 aggregate combat days (ACD) before a fate of (1) physical casualty, (2) prisoner of war, or (3) psychiatric casualty. For the first time, it was realized that every soldier had a “finite voltage” and sooner or later would break – even if they appeared to have held up magnificently under incredible stress. This understanding demarked a sharp change in thinking that previously held that soldiers that “broke” under pressure did so only due to some psychological flaw.

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